Card: Thinking of you

Hi friends, I’m here again today with another card to show you! I made this card in the same setting as the cards I made for the Danipeuss Card Challenge – here’s the link to card 1 and card 2 if you are interested in them. For anyone else who is interested to participate in the card challenge, there’s a new challenge up already, which you can check out here too!

This card started out as an experimentation of sorts, as I play around with supplies that I don’t usually use. I stamped the background with a striped border stamp using a red dye ink for some patterned background. It didn’t ink too well though, for some reason, and I can’t tell if it’s because I’m not using a mounting block or the stamp itself, because the results is the same when I use a pigment ink. Nonetheless, I went with it and took the splotchiness as a design feature as well by spritzing the whole panel with water mixed with perfect pearls. I got this idea from Jennifer McGuire, and it’s basically just filling a spray bottle with a spoonful of perfect pearls. You get a nice light shimmer coverage when you use this, which is really nice to add just a little something special to backgrounds. The light shimmer didn’t show up too well on the camera though, so I can’t show you how that actually looks, but it’s a really pretty and subtle shimmer.

I got some water on the card accidentally, and because I used dye ink on a super absorbent paper, there were some water splotches on the card as well. To cover up the mistake and to make it seem as though it is part of the plan, I dripped more of the perfect pearls water onto the water splotch and then elsewhere on the card. Some splotches are larger than others, and you get a nice pearly splotch if you drip enough on it, as it pushes the dye ink away. It’s also kind of meditative to watch the water push the ink away like a ripple effect. Here’s some close up look of the splotches:

You can see the slightly lighter colouring of the splotches, as well as a more concentrated dose of the shimmer.

The focal point of the card is this cute little ribbon that I’ve tied. While waiting for the background to dry, I came across this video on how to tie a ribbon in less than a minute, so of course I had to try it (and break out my stash of hardly ever used ribbons in the process). It turns out that the ribbon are really embellishment worthy if you have some nice coloured ribbons and the pink ribbon looked really nice when I auditioned it against the background. I glued the ribbon to the panel with some fabric glue, but any wet glue should work fine.

I decided to use the sentiment “Thinking of you”, which I thought would be a nice complement to the ribbon and the sweet colour scheme of the card. I wanted to keep the card basic and the focus on the ribbon, so I opted to write out the sentiment, rather than stamping it on. To echo the wide distance of the striped background, I first drafted out the sentiment on a grid paper, and then used it as a guide when I wrote out the sentiment on kraft cardstock. It’s not perfect placement, because I stumbled a little when I was writing it, but it’s close enough that I don’t scrutinise it – it’s alright to not be perfect in your projects! A tip if you like to hand-write sentiments or words like me: scrap pieces of cardstock are excellent for adding sentiment or word banners! You get to use up all the thinner scraps that don’t get much use otherwise and the thinner width makes it easier for you to align your writing or when trimming it. For the last finishing touches, I went over the entire banner with a Wink of Stella clear glitter pen, and coated it with a coat of Glossy Accents for an epoxy look.

Really like how that shimmer looks under a layer of Glossy Accents!

This is a really simple card put together with some basic supplies, and of course lots of play and experimentation. I hope you enjoy the various cards that I’ve shown you over the past week! If you made a card inspired by this card, share your card with me in the comments below! I would love to see what you made (:


Disclaimer: Some of the links above are affiliate links, and thus I would receive a small amount (at no addition costs to you) if you purchase through the links above. Your purchase will help support the blog and my small crafting business, and it will be much appreciated (: 

It’s not waste! Tea-stained paper from used teabags

I drink tea a lot, mostly black tea. A few years back I decided to try staining paper with tea because I’ve read about how it can aged paper so I started to do this when I had the time after a cup of tea. I experiment too, with different ways of making stained marks on the paper for some variety, even though by the nature of it each paper would be unique. I was staining some papers again today so I though I share a little on my process.

I will make a cup of tea of myself, and once I have finished the tea I will use the teabag for staining. Most of my tea are store bought and in pre-packed teabags. Each teabag can stain several pieces of paper, depending on how large the paper is too. I usually stain 11″ x 14″ papers, and do about 2-3 sheets of them, though you can definitely do more should you wish to. One important thing: teabags are rather fragile, so they will break apart during this process, which will end up in some degree of mess when the tea leaves come spilling out everywhere. So work on a surface that can be easily cleaned up. I also don’t recommend cleaning up immediately after this project, because the tea leaves are wet and in a clump, which doesn’t clean off that well. It is easier to clean them when they are dry, unless you are using a vacuum cleaner.

Here’s a look at the two sheets of paper I stained today:

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First sheet of paper. Technique: dragging teabag across the paper
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Second sheet of paper. Technique: pouncing teabag across the paper

I often start off with a light touch, so that the teabag doesn’t break apart that easily. The more tea leaves you have in your hand, the more number of sheets you can work on, so keep them in mind if you would like to meet many sheets at once.

The first sheet of paper is done by simply dragging the tea bag across the paper. I use the string attached to the tea bag to pull it across the paper so you can tell that the stains are a little bit more continuous. You could fill up the entire sheet of paper with stains if you wanted to, but I left some white spaces around for some interest. Dragging the teabag is probably the gentlest form of staining, as you can tell by the lack of tea leaves on the paper (as compared to the second photo). Do also take note that the first sheet of paper you work on would also buckle more than the others, because the teabag would still be rather wet from the tea drinking session.

The second sheet of paper is done by holding the teabag with your hand and then randomly pouncing onto the paper. This is when it starts to get rough and the teabag starts to break apart. You can tell by the tea leaves that are scattered all over the paper. However, this technique also gives you better control and a much more varied look and intensity of stains.

You can go even rougher and more intense from here, though I didn’t do them today because I wasn’t in the mood to clean up from the mess it would create. You could rub the tea bag on the paper, in a motion similar to ink blending tools. This causes the tea bag to rupture the most, spilling the tea leaves everywhere. The resulting stain will leave the marks from the rubbing motion, so it’s another different look altogether.

To clean up, I would suggest leaving the paper to dry. Once they are fairly dry you can proceed to brush off the tea leaves off the paper. As I mentioned earlier, this would be a much easier way to clean up when the tea leaves are dry. I mostly use these pieces of paper to make my art journals, treating them like patterned papers. You could do the same technique on like cardstock for cards or scrapbooking and any kind of paper actually. Hope you would give this a try and if you have any other technique of making stained marks on paper with teabags, share them in the comments below!

It’s not waste! Patterned strips from glossy paper

I have a mini tutorial for you today, and it’s all about recycling! I like to minimise my crafty waste because I feel that all our crafting supplies costs quite a bit so I don’t want to throw them away if I can help it. Reducing waste is also another mantra I have because we are consuming so much in our everyday lives and throwing away as much too. As a crafty bonus, working my way around these supposedly waste items gives me new crafty ideas to work on a constrain so it’s definitely a good crafty exercise.

Today, the focus would be on glossy paper. Now, I use glossy paper as a generic term for the texture of the paper. So this includes leftover glossy coated photo paper, sticker release sheets and even release paper from double sided tape! If you are confused with why I have leftover photo paper, I use my Canon Selphy photo printer, and the papers have strips on either side of the photo that you tear off the perforated lines.

These are things that we often just discard without thinking too much about them. But with some markers and a little bit of doodling, they can be transformed into patterned strips that you can use them for borders, banners, labels, embellishments and anything you can think of!

Here’s how they look after I have decorated them:

DSCN7912editedAnd here are the close ups of the designs:

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Stars randomly arranged or in a line
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Hearts, dashed lines and decorative edge with decorative scissors

Some tips to work with these glossy coated paper:

  • Photo paper: Water based markers will not work on this surface, so you will have to use alcohol based markers. You can try to stamp on it, but because of the slick surface not all ink pads will dry on the surface so you need to experiment a little.
  • Sticker release sheet: I tried to use markers on the slippery side (where the stickers were), but the ink just puddle up. So I flipped it over and doodled on the non-slippery side instead. I used water based markers here so you can use any type of markers you want. (update: the markers didn’t dry completely even after weeks of putting them down, and will smudge a little, though some of the marks were absorbed into the paper)
  • Double sided tape release paper: The release paper is slippery on both sides, and like the slippery surface of the sticker release sheet, I couldn’t get ink to stay on the paper without puddling up. So instead, I used a decorative edged scissors to make a decorative edge. You can try this with any decorative scissors you might have and give a different edge. If you don’t own any decorative scissors, you can just freehand for some wonky waves or zigzags!

I hope you do give this idea a try and give some crafty life into these waste! Let me know any new ideas that you have in the comments below!

Update: I had problems adhering the strips made from the sticker release sheets and double sided tape release paper using a tape runner – probably because the surface was designed to removed such adhesive easily from the sheets. You should use a glue stick or any wet adhesive, though note that the surface will be slippery when you put it down.

Creative crafting!